A how-to guide for digital publishing in a multi-screen world

Living in a multi-screen world-1

Recently, I was invited to speak at a conference for business journal publishers faced with a challenge all too familiar for print publications: How do we adapt and stay relevant in an ever-increasing digital world?

As part of the presentation, I laid out a framework to help shape publishers’ digital content strategy in a multi-screen world. I will go through the framework (Content TEPP) further down in this post.

Check out my full presentation here:

The digital revolution is inevitable. There is no turning back. The rise of smartphones, tablets, connected devices and the pervasiveness of social media means print will continue to decline. That doesn’t mean print will die (in fact, print is somewhat experiencing a come-back), but its importance and purpose will certainly change. Print will not be the end-all but one of many “screens.”

Depending on whom you address the digital revolution is either already here, or it’s fast approaching. And that’s the main challenge; we have two audiences to serve:

  1. The Digital Immigrants: The current audience of baby boomers currently enjoying a printed product but slowly getting used to the digital world
  2. The Digital Natives. (Hopefully) the future audience of young Gen X and Millenials who have never picked up a newspaper and instead grew up connected to the world via the Internet.

These two audiences consume media differently and they have different motivations and interests. Porting over your print content and “experience” to digital might work as an interim “migration strategy”, but it won’t cut it as a long term strategy attracting a new audience.

(For more details on this topic, check out Earl Wilkinson’s blog, where he, based on my presentation, muses over the differences between Natives and Immigrants)

Content TEPP: A digital content framework for a multi-screen world

With the Natives and Immigrants in mind and the realization that media consumption behaviors have changed, here’s a digital content framework for a multi-screen world:

digital publishing content framework

Type

Deciding on what type of content to produce is the most important part of your strategy. Of course. Forget mobile, forget digital and print. Your job is to deliver valuable content to your target audience, regardless of channel. Are the interests of Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives the same? Can your current content attract a new audience with vastly different interests? And how do you attract a new audience with new content without alienating your current audience?

Environment

Considering all the different screens, we need to understand the situation and context of our users. Then deliver and optimize content accordingly. It’s very different to sit down with a printed product and leaning back with a cup of coffee in the morning as compared to sitting on a bus with your smartphone and five minutes to spare.

multi-screen consumption by day part

Pace

Digital Natives want the right content at the right time. At their pace and on their schedule. Think about how many times you check your digital devices every day. Digital metabolism is much higher than print. The expectation is you’ll be updated, informed and entertained every time, whether you have five minutes or an hour to spare.

Packaging

Considering the Type, Enviroment and Pace, how do we package it all up for different screens while taking advantage of new digital tools not available in the analog world? Does the way we deliver content live up to the very high expectations of Digital Natives?

For a deeper dive, check out the case studies on Forbes, Yahoo News Digest and more in my presentation and learn how the Content TEPP framework applies in real-life.

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New iBook – iPad Design Lab: Storytelling in the Age of the Tablet

In the field of newspaper design, Dr. Mario Garcia is a bit of a legend. Having worked on more than 500 projects including working with some of the biggest news organizations in the World, such as Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post and Die Zeit, his experience and expertise is unparalleled.

As I started working on the OC Register iPad strategy, I became an avid reader of Mario’s blog. You see, Mario “got it” early on. He knew that the iPad would open new doors of opportunity and the time was ripe to start experimenting with this new and exciting canvas.

So, it’s very fitting what started as individual blog posts about iPad design now has become a full-fledged, multi-touch iBook (buy it in iTunes) dedicated to the exploration of tablet design for news apps.

Mario describes his book as a

“digital book for our times, whether you are a reporter, editor, designer, teacher, student, or just a tablet user with curiosity about strategies that lead to good storytelling in this marvelous new platform.”

Check out the intro video:

The book is chockfull of good information. Really, it should be required reading for anyone in news and content industries just starting to explore the tablet canvas. Mario covers these topics in the book: Storytelling, Navigation, Look & Feel, Pop-Ups, Advertising, Economics, and Media Quartet.

Of course, true to his tablet design beliefs, the book has an abundance of photo slide shows, audio and video files, hyper links, and much more. But the multi-media never get in the way of the written words. Fortunately, words still play an important part in the New World.

I’m honored to have contributed a case study for the book in the form of video interviews with my fellow colleagues at Next Issue on topics ranging from introducing Next Issue to talking about creating navigation paradigms for digital magazines. Case studies are a big part of the book by the way. And that’s great. We are all learning and experimenting together.

Congratulations Mario on a great and educational book! (Also congrats to Reed, who I know worked very hard as editor and art director on the book).

Buy iPad Design Lab in iTunes for $9.99 (you can get a sample for free too)

Must have apps for kids

A couple of weeks ago, I presented my must have apps. Now it’s my son’s turn. It’s only fair; he uses my iPad just as much as I do. Actually, he went somewhat viral at a young age based on this video (read the article here: PC World):

Viggo is now three and a half years old. We sit down every evening to pick out a book app to read. Here are his favorites. Please leave a comment and let me know which new apps we should pick up:

Below you will find descriptions and download links. The apps are sorted from most interactive to least. Each app passes my test for easy navigation that doesn’t interrupt the story: Continue reading “Must have apps for kids”

My must have apps for iPad

Ask me which apps I recommend for the iPad and I’ll talk passionately for hours (well at least 20 minutes) about the apps you simply cannot live without. I’m willing to listen too. As a matter of fact, the majority of my apps have come by way of recommendation from friends.

So, here’s the deal. I’ll share then you’ll share. Please leave a comment at the end and let me know what your favorite apps are.

The select few

Although I have filled all my 11 screens with apps (I don’t really like putting my apps in folders), I always come back to a select few. The same does my 3-year-old son, Viggo. The apps I use the most are clustered on a couple of screens and his are collected in another area. Let’s explore my favorite apps in this post. Then, for all the parents out there, Viggo will follow up with his favorite apps next week (read here). Check out links and descriptions below the image.

Continue reading “My must have apps for iPad”

What is Next Issue all about?

Haven’t really talked about my day-time job at Next Issue too much on this blog, but here’s an opportunity to share. In a nutshell, we offer enhanced editions of the world’s most popular magazines, optimized for tablets.

At CES last week, I had the pleasure to be interviewed by Ian Hamilton, my former colleague from OC Register and writer for the OC Unwired blog. In the interview we discuss where Next Issue fits in the digital publishing space. Specifically, Ian asks why we are focusing on Android tablets. Check out my answer to that and my pointers on what makes Next Issue unique. We are just getting started and 2012 will be an exciting year for us. Stay tuned for more news.

Let me know what you think of the video.

Check out Ian’s blog post here.

Designing newspaper and magazine editions for tablets

I have been invited to speak at two conferences in St. Louis. Same topic, two different audiences. That’s what I call synergy. I am in good company. I will be sharing the stage both Thursday and Friday with Mike Schmidt, Art Director at The Daily, while Robert Newman, Creative Director of Reader’s Digest will join us Friday. Topic of discussion: Designing newspaper and magazine editions for tablets.

Below you will find links to the presentations and some other blog posts I have been writing about tablet design and strategies in general.

Thursday presentation: The Newspaper Is Dead, Long Live the NewstabletPresented at: Tablet/Mobile Strategies and Visions for News Organizations, sponsored by the Reynolds Journalism Institute, the Digital Publishing Alliance, the American Society of News Editions and the Mid-America Press Institute.

Friday presentation: Designing For Tablet – The New Breed: Storyteller/Designer/Programmer. Presented at SND STL (Society for News Design)

Posts about tablet design and strategies

A Publisher’s Guide to Tablet Innovation

One Week Into Launch of News iPad App: What’s the Feedback?

Tablet Strategies for Publishers: Framework for Content and Form

Tablet Product Strategy Revealed (VIDEO)

What The Launch Of The Daily Means For Local Publishers